Dead Sea

Climatic Catastrophe: the Dead Sea is Drying Up

The Dead Sea is evaporating. The progressively rising temperatures in the Middle East are leading to a drop in water level by up to 3.3 ft (1 m) every year.

The Dead Sea is one of the most popular lakes for beach-goers in the entire world. It is located at the lowest elevation on land on the planet - a staggering 1410 ft (430 m) below sea level. It is 8 times saltier than any ocean in the world.

Those who go for a swim in it will notice that they can't sink - the salt keeps them afloat on the water's surface. To the east it borders Jordan and to the west - Palestine and Israel.

In recent years, scientists have recorded a fast and highly troubling shrinking of the lake. The sizzling Sun slowly and surely evaporates the water. Holes have appeared along the coast of the Dead Sea, leading to the collapse of several buildings.

The disappearance of the Dead Sea won't be sudden. However, the process will lead to great financial losses for tourism in the area. If the water continues to recede, one of the most popular resorts - Ein Gedi, built in 1980 - will have to be moved 1.2 mi (2 km) into sea.

Dead Sea Coast

Ein Gedi is enormous. It contains restaurants, baths and souvenir shops. The annual recession of the lake brings $50 000 in losses for the complex, reports resort manager Nir Vanger.

He himself grew up along the coast of the Dead Sea and grieves over the change in the setting. "Everything around my home is disappearing, " he shares with sadness in his eyes.

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